Browse Exhibits (5 total)

Conferences

1982_GRC_Group.jpg

In this exhibit, we provide information and pictures about some conference series (more to come).

We still need some group pictures, participants list (related to the group pictures) and are looking for other 'behind the scene' pictures you might have. If you have item you would like to see here, please consider contributing it. If you have questions, comments or corrections, please contact us.

Cover Images

Science, Cover 1972 February

In this exhibit, we provide information and pictures about some cover images. We have a collection of book covers and a collection of journal covers. (there are more to come).

We still need some group pictures, participants list (related to the group pictures) and are looking for other 'behind the scene' pictures you might have. If you have an item you would like to see here, please consider contributing it. If you have questions, comments or corrections, please contact us.

Other uses of "BZ"

20150111_B-Z-Mart_JoergSchlatterer-cut.pdf

In this collection, examples of how the abbreviation "BZ" is used outside of scientific fields are collected and displayed.

The shown examples are the first we uploaded, more to come in the future. If you have an interesting use, please contact us or contribute an item.

Scientists

2015_IrvFest2015_DickField_speech.jpg

Besides Boris P. Belousov and Anatol M. Zhabotinsky, there are many scientists who have made contributions to the understanding of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. In this exhibit, we have collected photos and short biographies of scientists who worked with the BZ Reaction.

We have decided to limit the scientists covered here to only those scientists who are no longer active in the field, and those who have chaired major conferences. If you have items you would like to see here, please consider contributing them, or if you have questions, comments, corrections or concerns, please contact us.

The beauty of the BZ reaction

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Science and art have always shared methods and tools. Much as photography invaded the fine arts a century ago, we today witness the evolution of fascinating computer art, a form of art which draws on the visualisation of quantitative scientific data. The easy transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, perspective images illustrates the invasion of computer technology, which readily permits what men have dreamed of since Kepler and Düer. Today, we are surprised by the aesthetic content of visualized "cold" scientific experiments and mathematical models and theories, and we discover that we can project scientific information into the language of art. This provides an aestheticized, and this humanized, representation of most complex scientific phenomena, which leads us into a new world of imagination and creativity.