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About the British in Chile

The close ties between Chile and Great Britain shaped the development of both countries: British sailors, merchants, engineers, teachers and many others helped Chile and other South American nations to gain independence, establish trade routes, build railroads and canals, dig mines, and staff schools; conversely, Chilean nitrates, copper, coal, guano and other raw materials were essential to the Industrial Revolution in Britain. In addition, some of these newspapers were produced by distinct subsets of the Anglo-American colony in Chile (English, Scottish, and American), and national identity is a consistent focus within the newspapers. As the leading commercial port along the Pacific coast before the development of the Panama canal, Valparaíso played a central role in the history of globalization. The newspapers published by the Anglo-American community in 19th and early 20th century Chile bring to life the strong historical ties between Britain and Latin America, enabling researchers to broaden and deepen our understanding of the global history of travel, migration, and exchange. UNESCO declared Valparaíso a World Heritage Site in 2003, calling the port city “an exceptional testimony to the early phase of globalisation in the late 19th century, when it became the leading commercial port on the sea routes of the Pacific coast of South America” (http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/959). The Anglo-Chilean relationship illuminates the broader history of cultural exchange between Britain and Latin America. British sailors, merchants, engineers, teachers and many others helped Chile and other South American nations to gain independence, establish trade routes, build railroads and canals, dig mines, and staff schools; conversely, Chilean nitrates, copper, coal, guano and other raw materials were essential to Britain's Industrial Revolution.